Cigarette Smoke Could Affect The Sale of Your Home

A few years ago, a group called the Clean Air Coalition was formed, and decided to declare the month of June to be Smoke Free Multi-Unit Housing Month. This coalition is a partnership between the BC Lung Association and the Heart and Stroke Foundation BC & Yukon with the goal of raising awareness about the harmful effects of second hand smoke. These days people are generally pretty conscientious about this, and awareness has certainly increased substantially from a decade ago. But what about smoking in your own home? The goal of this coalition would like to see all multi-unit housing become smoke free. The Federal Government is also considering banning smoking in shared housing such as condos and apartment buildings. While this initiative is being debated more strongly in some provinces than others, it’s something to think about regardless of which province or territory you call home. Here are a few issues the coalition have identified and changes they are working toward.

The health risks of second hand cigarette smoke have been well researched. With more people living in apartments, condos, and other forms of shared housing, drifting cigarette smoke from a neighbouring unit can cause health concerns, especially in children. So the concern is that even though the neighbours in Unit A are non-smokers, they are still affected by the second hand smoke of their neighbours in Unit B. So whose rights should be legally defended, the right to clean air for the people living in Unit A, or the rights of the people in Unit B to pursue lawful activities in the privacy of their home?

The coalition is also asking that buildings be given a smoking status. If landlords and strata corporations were required to provide tenants or buyers with a building’s smoking status, people would know where the smoking units were located before they moved in and they could be spaced or grouped accordingly.

For new strata properties, some proposed changes would include possible amendments to legislation requiring that all new shared housing buildings be smoke free, unless owners pass a 3/4 vote to allow smoking. Incentives to this end could include lower insurance, or possible tax credits.

Stale smoke odours can be a real turn off for non-smoking buyers. Smoking can reduce the resale value of a property by as much as 29% according to a 2013 survey published by CBC, Smoke particulates are so small they can cling to any surface including wall surfaces, carpets, and furniture. Before you spray air fresheners, read this blog post, which offers some helpful tips for getting the smoke smell out of your home in preparation to sell.

If you’re considering selling you home, talk to our Urban Realty Group. We can provide you with more tips to get your home clean, staged, and ready for market. Let’s get started!